The National Gambling Impact Study Commission issued 76 recommendations in 1999. An update on some of them:

RECOMMENDATION: Outlaw betting on collegiate and amateur sports.

STATUS: House and Senate committees voted overwhelmingly last year to ban betting on college sports, legal only in Nevada, but the measure was not brought up for floor votes. This year, the Senate Commerce Committee approved the ban by only one vote. No floor vote has been scheduled.

RECOMMENDATION: Ban Internet gambling.

STATUS: A ban twice passed the Senate but was stalled in the House by questions about enforcement and exemptions. Meantime, Nevada is preparing to approve online gambling. MGM Mirage Chairman J. Terrence Lanni, whose company owns casinos in Nevada, supported a ban while serving on the commission but now favors regulating and taxing Internet gambling Togel Hongkong .

RECOMMENDATION: Restrict legal gambling to those 21 and older.

STATUS: In many states it remains legal for people as young as 18 to bet at race tracks or buy lottery tickets. Last year and again this year, the Senate Commerce Committee rejected a national minimum gambling age of 21.

RECOMMENDATION: Bar cash-dispensing machines from the immediate area where gambling occurs.

STATUS: Rep. John LaFalce, D-N.Y., proposed legislation to implement the recommendation, but it not received a hearing. Critics say the proposal, designed to outlaw cash machines from casino floors, would also exile them from convenience stores that sell lottery tickets.

RECOMMENDATION: States should require insurance companies to cover treatment for compulsive gambling.

STATUS: Keith Whyte, executive director of the National Council on Problem Gambling, said roughly 80 percent of insurers still routinely deny reimbursement for treatment. “No state laws, no state insurance commissioners, have addressed this,” he said.

RECOMMENDATION: Congress should ask the National Science Foundation to research the costs and benefits of all forms of gambling, legal and illegal.

STATUS: After a review, the NSF declined to pursue such research. Spokesman William Noxon said the prevailing view of experts was the proposed study was not practical, given its “tangential connection to NSF’s mission and the many other important areas of research needing attention.”

RECOMMENDATION: States should curtail the growth of new lottery games, reduce lottery advertising and limit locations for lottery machines.

STATUS: Minnesota Lottery Director George Anderson, past president of the North American Association of State and Provincial Lotteries, said states have not altered their lotteries in response to the report. Later this year South Carolina will become the 38th state with a lottery.

RECOMMENDATION: States should not allow any new casino-style gambling at horse tracks, dog tracks and jai-alai facilities.

STATUS: States continue to consider expanded gambling to subsidize purses at ailing tracks. West Virginia’s lottery commission this month approved 595 additional video slot machines at Mountaineer Race Track.

RECOMMENDATION: States should adopt restrictions on contributions to state and local campaigns by people or companies that operate gambling facilities.

STATUS: A Louisiana law banning political contributions by operators of video poker machines was struck down in 1999 as unconstitutional. But New Jersey, Nebraska and Michigan are among several states that still enforce campaign finance restrictions against the gambling industry.